Garden of Stillborn Idols

Dyssebeia

The album was sterile, as Tech Death can be, but the band also used a good deal of melody interwoven into the complexities, which is pretty unusual. Besides their obvious talent on their instruments, they are also quite adept at their compositional craft.
November 19, 2023

“Swiss band DYSSEBEIA have come up with an exhilarating debut full length of Progressive Blackened Death Metal music that blends the elements seamlessly and reinterprets them elegantly with emphasis on clean delivery, unhindered structuring, and the right treatment of the emotive melodies.” The album has eight songs. “Mors Tua Vita Mea” is first. The opening tones are somewhat melodic and technical, but lead to a blueprint that is more dissonant, with harsh vocals. The band’s mastery of complicated meters and rhythms is also evident.

“Retribution” follows a similar approach, with a technical and complex bottom end underneath some melodies here and there. They let a little more melody out here and it is nice to hear. “Moon Bearer” has some unusual chord progressions, and three songs in, you can really hear the band’s talent. Some of the passages are so tight that you could squeeze a dime between them. Their use of melody is also interesting…they are clearly capable of them but they only tease the listener and focus mostly on technical elements. “Sacrificed on the Threshold” begins with some clean tones that segue into a collection of instruments and passages that can only aptly be described as “synergy.”

“Hatch” is tentative at first, but quickly turns dark and deadly. The technical elements are amplified in this song that has very little melody. “Black Swarm” hears the chaotic strictures relax just a bit in the opening, but returning full force soon thereafter. Again, the chords go to unexpected areas and this is truly a sign of a talented band, because they keep you guessing. The bass work is fantastic as well. “Funeral Ink” is another song that leads with acoustic guitars but what follows can be described as a deep and angry sadness that morphs between emotions as it passes. This song has the perfect balance between saber-toothed fangs and the gentle bite of a lover.

“Apophenia” closes the album. Despite some early streamlined and mechanical tones, the chorus is very well done with melody. Let it carry you into uncharted territory, and expand your consciousness.  Eight songs was the perfect length for this album, because if there were any more, the complex math it would take to decipher them might drive you insane. The album was sterile, as Tech Death can be, but the band also used a good deal of melody interwoven into the complexities, which is pretty unusual. Besides their obvious talent on their instruments, they are also quite adept at their compositional craft.

 

8 / 10

Excellent

Songwritting

8

Musicianship

9

Memorability

7

Production

9
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"Garden of Stillborn Idols" Track-listing:

1. Mors Tua, Vita Mea

2. Retribution

3. Moon Bearer

4. Sacrificed on the Threshold

5. Hatch

6. Black Swarm

7. Funeral Ink

8. Apophenia

 

Dyssebeia Lineup:

Alexandre Sotirov – Vocals

Merlin Bogado – Guitars

Duran Bathija – Bass

Sam Jakubec – Drums

 

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